JACKSON FIRE DISTRICT NO. 3

BUREAU OF FIRE SAFETY

ENFORCEMENT   *   PREVENTION   *   EDUCATION

 

Fire District 3Fire BureauFire SafetyResourcesCalendarPhoto GalleryNJ Fire SafetyFire ApparutusContacts 

MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A WORKING CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR AND SMOKE DETECTOR... CONTACT THE FIRE BUREAU TO RECEIVE A FREE BATTERY OPERATED SMOKE DETECTOR

FIRE SAFETY FACTS AND TIPS

 

           

FIREFIGHTER  TRADING CARDS PAGE

NFPA FIRE SAFETY TIPS

BBQ GRILLING FIRE SAFETY CANDLE FIRE SAFETY COOKING FIRE SAFETY
CARBON MONOXIDE COLLEGE DORMITORY SAFETY CHRISTMAS TREE FIRE SAFETY
CAR FIRE SAFETY DISABILITY SAFETY DRYER FIRE SAFETY
ESCAPE PLANNING ELECTRICAL FIRE SAFETY FIREWORKS
GENERATOR SAFETY HEATING FIRE SAFETY HOVER BOARDS
MICROWAVE FIRE SAFETY OUTDOOR ELECTRIC SAFETY OXYGEN SAFETY
PORTABLE FIREPLACE PORTABLE HEATERS SMOKE DETECTORS
SMOKING FIRE SAFETY THANKSGIVING FIRE SAFETY WINTER HOLIDAYS
WINTER FIRE SAFETY WOOD STOVE SAFETY YOUNG FIRESETTERS

Fire Safety – Before, During and After a Fire in Your Home

 

Commemorating a conflagration

Fire Prevention Week was established to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire, the tragic 1871 conflagration that killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres. The fire began on October 8, but continued into and did most of its damage on October 9, 1871. According to popular legend, the fire broke out after a cow - belonging to Mrs. Catherine O'Leary - kicked over a lamp, setting first the barn, then the whole city on fire. Chances are you've heard some version of this story yourself; people have been blaming the Great Chicago Fire on the cow and Mrs. O'Leary, for more than 130 years. But recent research by Chicago historian Robert Cromie has helped to debunk this version of events.

The 'Moo' myth
Like any good story, the 'case of the cow' has some truth to it. The great fire almost certainly started near the barn where Mrs. O'Leary kept her five milking cows. But there is no proof that O'Leary was in the barn when the fire broke out - or that a jumpy cow sparked the blaze. Mrs. O'Leary herself swore that she'd been in bed early that night, and that the cows were also tucked in for the evening. But if a cow wasn't to blame for the huge fire, what was? Over the years, journalists and historians have offered plenty of theories. Some blamed the blaze on a couple of neighborhood boys who were near the barn sneaking cigarettes. Others believed that a neighbor of the O'Leary's may have started the fire. Some people have speculated that a fiery meteorite may have fallen to earth on October 8, starting several fires that day - in Michigan and Wisconsin, as well as in Chicago.

The biggest blaze that week
While the Great Chicago Fire was the best-known blaze to start during this fiery two-day stretch, it wasn't the biggest. That distinction goes to the Peshtigo Fire, the most devastating forest fire in American history. The fire, which also occurred on October 8th, 1871, and roared through Northeast Wisconsin, burning down 16 towns, killing 1,152 people, and scorching 1.2 million acres before it ended.Historical accounts of the fire say that the blaze began when several railroad workers clearing land for tracks unintentionally started a brush fire. Before long, the fast-moving flames were whipping through the area 'like a tornado,' some survivors said. It was the small town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin that suffered the worst damage. Within an hour, the entire town had been destroyed.Eight decades of fire prevention
Those who survived the Chicago and Peshtigo fires never forgot what they'd been through; both blazes produced countless tales of bravery and heroism. But the fires also changed the way that firefighters and public officials thought about fire safety. On the 40th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire, the Fire Marshals Association of North America (today known as the International Fire Marshals Association), decided that the anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire should henceforth be observed not with festivities, but in a way that would keep the public informed about the importance of fire prevention.  The commemoration grew incrementally official over the years.

In 1920, President Woodrow Wilson issued the first National Fire Prevention Day proclamation, and since 1922, Fire Prevention Week has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls. According to the National Archives and Records Administration's Library Information Center, Fire Prevention Week is the longest running public health and safety observance on record. The President of the United States has signed a proclamation proclaiming a national observance during that week every year since 1925.

 

 

Click Here For Important Information

Fire Prevention Week 2007

PLEASE HELP US HELP YOU !

PLEASE DIG OUT YOUR LOCAL FIRE HYDRANT, FIRE LANES AND EXIT DOORS

YOUR LIFE AND PROPERTY MAY DEPEND ON IT ! 

Are You Prepared for Hurricane Season

Hurricanes can cause catastrophic damage to coastlines and several hundred miles inland. Winds can exceed 155 miles per hour. Hurricanes and tropical storms can also spawn tornadoes and microburst, create storm surges along the coast, and cause extensive damage from heavy rainfall. Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and damage potential. Category Three and higher hurricanes are considered major hurricanes, though Categories One and Two are still extremely dangerous and warrant your full attention.

Hurricanes can produce widespread torrential rain. Floods are the deadly and destructive result. Slow moving storms and tropical storms moving into mountainous regions tend to produce especially heavy rain. Excessive rain can trigger landslides or mud slides, especially in mountainous regions. Flash flooding can occur due to intense rainfall. Flooding on rivers and streams may persist for several days or more after the storm.

Before a Hurricane

  • Make plans to secure your property. Board up windows with 5/8” marine plywood.
  • Be sure trees and shrubs around your home are well trimmed.
  • Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts.
  • Determine how and where to secure your boat.

During a Hurricane

  • Listen to the radio or TV for information.
  • Secure your home, close storm shutters, and secure outdoor objects or bring them indoors.
  • Turn off utilities if instructed & turn the refrigerator thermostat to its coldest setting.
  • Turn off propane tanks· Avoid using the phone, except for serious emergencies.
  • Have a supply of water for sanitary purposes. Fill the bathtub with containers of water.

Evacuation

  • If you are directed by local authorities to do so. Be sure to follow their instructions.
  • If you live in a mobile home or temporary structure—such shelters are particularly hazardous during hurricanes no matter how well fastened to the ground.
  • Near a river or waterway.
  • If you feel you are in danger.

Unable to Evacuate

  • Stay indoors during the hurricane and away from windows and glass doors.
  • Close all interior doors—secure and brace external doors.
  • Take refuge in a small interior room, closet, or hallway on the lowest level.

 

What a difference a spray makes in fire safety

Officials tout importance of home sprinklers

By CHELSEA MICHELS APP TOMS RIVER BUREAU

May 12, 2009 -As part of a demonstration, a fire that started in a garbage can ripped through a room in a matter of minutes, leaving only a blackened, gutted shell behind. In a similar room, a fire blackened only a curtain and garbage can before a single sprinkler kicked on, drenching it with water and lessening the potential damage. The major difference between the two rooms was part of a demonstration put on by the Uniform Fire Prevention/Protection Association of Ocean County, New Jersey Fire Safety Commission and National Sprinkler Association to show how sprinklers in residential buildings greatly reduce the size and severity of fires, saving lives of residents and firefighters.

"(Having sprinklers) is the equivalent of having a fire department at your residence," said Bob Yaiser, public education officer for the Toms River Bureau of Fire Prevention. "We don't hesitate to sprinkle our front lawn to keep our grass from burning. Why would you not want to spend the money to protect your home and save yourself?" Approximately 100 members of local fire organizations and the public gathered to watch a real-time demonstration of how a fire affected two identical dormlike rooms, one with sprinklers and one without.

According to Chief John F. Lightbody of the Toms River Bureau of Fire Prevention, approximately 3,000 residents and 115 firefighters die nationwide each year in fires, specifically in one- and two-family dwellings. The New Jersey Fire Commission Master Plan Committee, of which Lightbody is chairman, is lobbying for legislation requiring all new one- and two-family dwellings built after 2012 to have residential sprinklers.

Yaiser said the Seton Hall dorm fires in January 2000 inspired the nation's first law requiring sprinklers in dormitories at colleges. "There has never been a multiple loss of life in a fully suppressed building," said David Kurasz, executive director of the New Jersey Fire Sprinkler Advisory Board. He said the sprinklers help buy families a lot of time, explaining that in 1975 families had approximately 17 minutes to escape a house fire, a number which dwindled to three minutes in 2003. This is due largely to lightweight construction and hazardous contents in homes, he said.

Kurasz said the sprinklers go into effect once the temperature reaches 155 degrees and are not activated by smoke. Only the sprinklers closest to the fire release water, which is approximately 15 to 25 gallons per minute, compared to 150 to 250 gallons per minute with a fire hose. Heidi Michel, the fire official for Stafford, was watching the demonstration with Chris Freeman, Stafford's fire inspector. "We're concerned with resident safety and firefighter safety," said Freeman. "It could make a huge difference with these (sprinklers)."

Bedroom Without Sprinklers

Bedroom With Sprinklers